Workshop Presenters

Presenting in 1st Set of Workshops on Wednesday Morning: 

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Karl Tomm, MD FRCPC, is a Professor of Psychiatry in the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary. In 1973 he founded the Family Therapy Program which became the Calgary Family Therapy

Centre where he continues as the Director. Karl is interested in the application of systems theory, narrative theory, social constructionism, and

bringforthism to therapy. His work has focused on clarifying patterns of interaction in families, the effects of social injustices on relationships, the influence on therapists of the distinctions they draw, and the possible therapeutic effects of the questions asked in the doing of therapy.

Title:

IPscope Review and Update

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Dr. Joaquín Gaete Silva is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Calgary, and a Registered Psychologist in Alberta, Canada. He currently holds a position as an Associate Director at the Calgary Family Therapy Centre (www.familytherapy.org), where he also practices family therapy and clinical supervision. He is interested in practicing, teaching and researching therapy as a vehicle to promote peace and social justice through human development and relational well-being. His practice and research is informed by cultural psychology, focusing on interpersonal conflict, problematic disruptive behavior, change process, and clinical supervision. 

Inés Sametband, PhD., is an Assistant Professor at Mount Royal University, a registered marriage and family therapist (AAMFT), and a provisionally registered psychologist in Alberta. Her practice as an instructor, researcher, and clinician is informed by discursive and collaborative family therapy approaches. Her research focuses on how locally relevant cultural ideas and practices influence family relations, and how they feature in therapy conversations. She is currently conducting a qualitative inquiry on how family therapists engage with clients in ways that recognize and are inclusive of clients’ preferred cultural memberships. 

Title:

'TIPs' to Move from Disquieting Disruption to Generative Participation 

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Monica Sesma-Vazquez, PhD, RSW, RMFT (She/Her). Monica is a social constructionist-oriented family therapist, educator, supervisor, and researcher. She is an Assistant Professor and the Academic Coordinator of the Couple and Family Therapy Program in the Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary. She works as a family therapist 

and supervisor at the Calgary Family Therapy Centre where she is also the ResearchCoordinator. Monica is currently a Board Member of the Taos Institute and the Canadian Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Her current research interests focus on children and families, and immigrants, refugees, and newcomers’ systemic issues.

Title:

Resistance, Reflexivity, and Revelations: What "Disquieting" Moments in Therapy Tell Us About Our Values

Presenting in 2nd Set of Workshops on Wednesday Afternoon: 

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David Epston originated what has come to be known as narrative therapy along with his close friend and colleague, Michael White. This led in the first instance to White and Epston(1990) Narrative Means to Therapeutic Ends and Epston and White(1992), Experience, Contradiction, Narrative and Imagination. More recently he has collaborated on other

publications: Maisel, Epston and Borden(2004), Biting the Hand that Starves You: Inspiring Resistance to

Anorexia/Bulimia; Marsten, Epston and 

Markham(2016), Narrative Therapy in Wonderland: Connecting with Children's Imaginative Know-how; NiaNia, Bush and Epston(2017), Taitahono: Stories of Maori Healing and Psychiatry, Heath, Carlson and Epston(2022), Reimagining Narrative Therapy through Practice Stories and Autoethnography and Tejs Jorring with June Alexander and David Epston(2022), Narrative Psychiatry and Family Collaborations. Over the years he has taught widely around the world.

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Kay Ingamells is a narrative social worker, counsellor, and family Therapist. Kay has worked with children,

young people, and families since 1990 in many settings in New Zealand and in the UK, and now works in private practice and teaches narrative therapy. She taught narrative therapy on undergraduate and postgraduate courses at Unitec NZ from 2006 -2016. Kay has been supervised by David Epston since 2003. She has published numerous articles on her practice. Kay can be contacted at kay@yourstory.org.nz

Title:

What is a Good Question?

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Sheila McNamee is Professor Emerita of Communication at the University of New Hampshire

and co-founder and Vice President of the Taos Institute (taosinstitute.net). Her work is focused on dialogic transformation within a variety of social and institutional contexts including psychotherapy, education, healthcare, organizations, and communities. She is author of several books and articles, including Practicing Therapy as Social Construction (with E. Rasera & P. Martins, Sage Publications, 2022), Design Thinking and Social Construction (with C. Camargo-Borges, BIS, 2022), Research and Social Change: A Relational Constructionist Approach (with D. M. Hosking, Routledge, 2012), Relational Responsibility: Resources for Sustainable Dialogue (with K. Gergen, Sage, 1999), and Education as Social Construction: Contributions to Theory, Research, and Practice, co-edited with T. Dragonas, K. Gergen, E. Tseliou (Taos WorldShare, 2015). Professor McNamee has written extensively about alternative visions of social research.

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John Lannamann is an Emeritus Associate Professor of Communication at the University of

New Hampshire and an Associate of the Taos Institute. From 2005 through 2017 he was a member of the graduate faculty in the Program in Social Psychology at the University of Parma, Italy. Professor Lannamann’s work explores the implications of social

constructionist approaches for understanding embodiment and technology. Another theme in his recent work is the exploration of dialogic coordination in therapeutic settings and in end-of-life communication patterns. His published work assessing the possibilities and limitations of social constructionist approaches to the study of human interaction

appear in Theory and Psychology, Human Systems, Family Process, Journal of Family Therapy, 

Communication Theory, Communication Monographs, The Journal of Strategic and Systemic Therapies, and a number of other scholarly journals and books.

Title:

Dialogic Coordination within Relational Disquiet

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Shannon McIntosh is a family therapist and clinical supervisor at the Calgary Family Therapy Centre (CFTC). An empath with excellent training, Shannon is devoted to strengthening relationships, building resiliency, and applying her fiery passion for advocacy, collaboration and creativity in her work. Shannon is inspired by systemic theory, narrative theory and social
constructionism. With deeply insightful thought and heart, she strives to empower families while honouring each client’s unique culture. Shannon upholds social justice, and enjoys using metaphors, expressive arts and experiential learning to bring forth relational healing. She feels 
fortunate to have applied her therapeutic skills with children, youth and families within Alberta
Health Services, as well as nonprofit organizations such as CFTC. Along with her commitment to CFTC, Shannon is a sessional instructor in the Faculty of Social Work at University of Calgary. She enjoys spending time with family and friends, singing, writing, and running along Calgary’s beautiful trails.

Title:

Working with Families Struggling with High Discrepancy: Therapeutic Practices to Traverse
Relational Disquiet

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Cheryl White works at Dulwich Centre as publisher, editor, teacher, training co-ordinator, conference host, and initiator of projects. 

Title:

What Would You Have Done? Stories of Complexity from the Field of Narrative Therapy and Community Work 

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David Denborough works as a community worker, teacher and writer/editor for Dulwich Centre. He is particularly interested in cross-cultural partnerships which limit the chances of psychological colonization and create possibilities for cross-cultural inventions

Title:

What Would You Have Done? Stories of Complexity from the Field of Narrative Therapy and Community Work 

Presenting in 3rd Set of Workshops on Thursday Morning: 

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Stephen Madigan MSW, MSc, PhD, is an award-winning narrative therapist, best-selling therapy author, Training Director of the Vancouver School for Narrative Therapy, content manager of VSNT.live, long-time supervisor to Norway’s High Couple Conflict Teams, and wrote the first ever doctoral dissertation on narrative therapy. His therapy work is studied in Graduate University programs across the world through various media forms such as the American Psychological Associations production of a set of six professional learning videos filming his live narrative practice, and the 1st and 2nd Edition of his book Narrative Therapy, published in 2011 & 2019 (3 rd Edition out in 2023). Stephen teaches, trains, consults, and supervises world-wide.

Title:

Relationships are Relational...

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Laura Fruggeri, Psychologist and Psychotherapist. She completed her training in systemic therapy with Luigi Boscolo and Gianfranco Cecchin with whom she has also collaborated ever since for many years. Former Professor of Psychology of Family Relationship at the University of Parma, she is now Director of the Bologna Centre of Family Therapy. She has been extensively teaching in UK, Europe, North and South America for more than three decades. Presenter at main national and international conferences. She is author of more than a hundred publications in Italian, English, French, Spanish, Danish and German.

Title:

When the Disquiet is in the Therapist-Client Relationship: the Need for an “Epistemological

Competency” in the Psychotherapeutic Practice

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Taimalieutu Kiwi Tamasese is a Samoan family therapist, community worker, and researcher. She is

Coordinator of the Pacific Section at the Family Centre. One of her outstanding research achievements is the development of fa’afaletui methodology, which is a research method that is sensitive and responsive to cultural norms and methodologically rigorous. The work was funded by the Health Research Council and subsequently published as a ‘Qualitative Investigation into Samoan Perspectives on Mental Health and Culturally Appropriate Services’ Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry in 2005, Vol. 39 (4). She is one of the founders of ‘Just Therapy’, an internationally recognised approach to addressing cultural, gender, and socioeconomic contexts in therapy. She has been a Joint recipient of the American Family Therapy Academy (AFTA) Award for a Distinguished Contribution to Social Justice and the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy Special Award for Distinguished Contributions to Family Therapy.

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Charles Waldegrave is Coordinator of the Family Centre Pākehā (European) Section and leader of the

Family Centre Social Policy Research Unit. He co-leads the ‘New Zealand Poverty Measurement

Project’ (NZPMP) which has provided the evidence base for social and economic changes in New

Zealand including, the anti-child poverty ‘Working for Families’ package and seven of the ten

measures in the Child Poverty Reduction Act 2018. He leads the team that sets the Living Wage

annually for the country.

He is one of the founders of ‘Just Therapy’, an internationally recognised approach to addressing

cultural, gender and socioeconomic contexts in therapy. He has been a Joint recipient of the

American Family Therapy Academy (AFTA) Award for a Distinguished Contribution to Social Justice

and the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy Special Award for Distinguished

Contributions to Family Therapy. He publishes regularly in all of the above areas.

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Monica Mercury (Te Iwi Morehu, Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Hainamana – Māori tribal affiliations)

holds a Master of Education degree from Te Herenga Waka - Victoria University of Wellington.

Monica was an educator in the primary sector for many years and comes from a whānau with a long

history in whānau Māori, social and community development via Indigenous-inspired activities.

Monica is The Family Centre Whānau Therapist-Counsellor and a Kaupapa Māori researcher. She is

currently part of the Awhi Whānau team – The Māori branch of the Family Centre Social Policy

Research Unit implementing ‘For Māori as Māori by Māori’ research projects.

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Tafaoimalo Loudeen Parsons is a member of the Pacific section of the Family Centre. She is an

experienced Pacific family therapist, community development worker and researcher. In 2009 she

was a joint recipient of the World Bank Prize in the Development Market Place Global Competition

on Climate Change Adaptation. She has been a co-author on numerous Pacific focussed research and

evaluation reports for government Ministries. She also contributed substantially to the Pacific part of

an international publication Waldegrave, C., King, P., Maniapoto, M., Tamasese, T., Parsons, T., and

Sullivan, G. (2016) “Relational Resilience in Māori, Pacific, and European Sole Parent Families: From

Theory and Research to Social Policy”, Family Process, Vol. 55, No. 4. 673–688.

Title:

Ascribing meaning in therapeutic conversations: The contexts that make the difference

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David Nylund, MSW, PhD is a professor of Social Work at California State University, Sacramento. He is the Clinical Director and co-founder of the Gender Health Centre, a grass roots agency in Sacramento that serves the trans and queer communities. David is on the faculty of the Vancouver School for Narrative Therapy. He is widely published in the areas of cultural studies,

queer theory, family therapy, and narrative therapy.

Title:

Relational Therapy with Transgender Youth and Their Families

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Lance Taylor, R.Psych. I began my study of Solution Focused Brief Therapy with Steve de Shazer, Insoo

Kim Berg at the Brief Family Therapy Centre in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. These learnings have been

nurtured through 30 years working in Community Mental Health services as a therapist, supervisor,

manager, private practitioner and trainer. In therapeutic conversations with clients and collaboration

with colleagues, I seek to simplify my practice and description of the solution focus. I relish the

resonance with the bringforthist practice framework at the Calgary Family Therapy Centre and enjoy the

fruitful meeting between the solution focus and the IPscope.

Title:

Bringing Forth Wellness with the Solution Focused Framework

Presenting in 4th Set of Workshops on Thursday Afternoon: 

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David Epston originated what has come to be known as narrative therapy along with his close friend and colleague, Michael White. This led in the first instance to White and Epston(1990) Narrative Means to Therapeutic Ends and Epston and White(1992), Experience, Contradiction, Narrative and Imagination. More recently he has collaborated on other

publications: Maisel, Epston and Borden(2004), Biting the Hand that Starves You: Inspiring Resistance to

Anorexia/Bulimia; Marsten, Epston and 

Markham(2016), Narrative Therapy in Wonderland: Connecting with Children's Imaginative Know-how; NiaNia, Bush and Epston(2017), Taitahono: Stories of Maori Healing and Psychiatry, Heath, Carlson and Epston(2022), Reimagining Narrative Therapy through Practice Stories and Autoethnography and Tejs Jorring with June Alexander and David Epston (2022), Narrative Psychiatry and Family Collaborations. Over the years he has taught widely around the world.

Kay.jpg

Kay Ingamells is a narrative social worker, counsellor, and family Therapist. Kay has worked with children,

young people, and families since 1990 in many settings in New Zealand and in the UK, and now works in private practice and teaches narrative therapy. She taught narrative therapy on undergraduate and postgraduate courses at Unitec NZ from 2006 - 2016. Kay has been supervised by David Epston since 2003. She has published numerous articles on her practice. Kay can be contacted at kay@yourstory.org.nz

Title:

Redeeming your Reputation: An Approach to Stealing and other Moral Offences

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Sheila McNamee is Professor Emerita of Communication at the University of New Hampshire

and co-founder and Vice President of the Taos Institute (taosinstitute.net). Her work is focused on dialogic transformation within a variety of social and institutional contexts including psychotherapy, education, healthcare, organizations, and communities. She is author of several books and articles, including Practicing Therapy as Social Construction (with E. Rasera & P. Martins, Sage Publications, 2022), Design Thinking and Social Construction (with C. Camargo-Borges, BIS, 2022), Research and Social Change: A Relational Constructionist Approach (with D. M. Hosking, Routledge, 2012), Relational Responsibility: Resources for Sustainable Dialogue (with K. Gergen, Sage, 1999), and Education as Social Construction: Contributions to Theory, Research, and Practice, co-edited with T. Dragonas, K. Gergen, E. Tseliou (Taos WorldShare, 2015). Professor McNamee has written extensively about alternative visions of social research.

000041870002.jpeg

John Lannamann is an Emeritus Associate Professor of Communication at the University of

New Hampshire and an Associate of the Taos Institute. From 2005 through 2017 he was a member of the graduate faculty in the Program in Social Psychology at the University of Parma, Italy. Professor Lannamann’s work explores the implications of social

constructionist approaches for understanding embodiment and technology. Another theme in his recent work is the exploration of dialogic coordination in therapeutic settings and in end-of-life communication patterns. His published work assessing the possibilities and limitations of social constructionist approaches to the study of human interaction

appear in Theory and Psychology, Human Systems, Family Process, Journal of Family Therapy, 

Communication Theory, Communication Monographs, The Journal of Strategic and Systemic Therapies, and a number of other scholarly journals and books.

Title:

Dialogic Coordination within Relational Disquiet

Taimalieutu Kiwi Tamasese_edited.jpg

Taimalieutu Kiwi Tamasese is a Samoan family therapist, community worker, and researcher. She is

Coordinator of the Pacific Section at the Family Centre. One of her outstanding research achievements is the development of fa’afaletui methodology, which is a research method that is sensitive and responsive to cultural norms and methodologically rigorous. The work was funded by the Health Research Council and subsequently published as a ‘Qualitative Investigation into Samoan Perspectives on Mental Health and Culturally Appropriate Services’ Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry in 2005, Vol. 39 (4). She is one of the founders of ‘Just Therapy’, an internationally recognised approach to addressing cultural, gender, and socioeconomic contexts in therapy. She has been a Joint recipient of the American Family Therapy Academy (AFTA) Award for a Distinguished Contribution to Social Justice and the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy Special Award for Distinguished Contributions to Family Therapy.

charles 3 (002)_edited.jpg

Charles Waldegrave is Coordinator of the Family Centre Pākehā (European) Section and leader of the

Family Centre Social Policy Research Unit. He co-leads the ‘New Zealand Poverty Measurement

Project’ (NZPMP) which has provided the evidence base for social and economic changes in New

Zealand including, the anti-child poverty ‘Working for Families’ package and seven of the ten

measures in the Child Poverty Reduction Act 2018. He leads the team that sets the Living Wage

annually for the country.

He is one of the founders of ‘Just Therapy’, an internationally recognised approach to addressing

cultural, gender and socioeconomic contexts in therapy. He has been a Joint recipient of the

American Family Therapy Academy (AFTA) Award for a Distinguished Contribution to Social Justice

and the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy Special Award for Distinguished

Contributions to Family Therapy. He publishes regularly in all of the above areas.

Monica Mercury 2021 (003).jpg

Monica Mercury (Te Iwi Morehu, Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Hainamana – Māori tribal affiliations)

holds a Master of Education degree from Te Herenga Waka - Victoria University of Wellington.

Monica was an educator in the primary sector for many years and comes from a whānau with a long

history in whānau Māori, social and community development via Indigenous-inspired activities.

Monica is The Family Centre Whānau Therapist-Counsellor and a Kaupapa Māori researcher. She is

currently part of the Awhi Whānau team – The Māori branch of the Family Centre Social Policy

Research Unit implementing ‘For Māori as Māori by Māori’ research projects.

Tafaoimalo Loudeen Parsons.jpg

Tafaoimalo Loudeen Parsons is a member of the Pacific section of the Family Centre. She is an

experienced Pacific family therapist, community development worker and researcher. In 2009 she

was a joint recipient of the World Bank Prize in the Development Market Place Global Competition

on Climate Change Adaptation. She has been a co-author on numerous Pacific focussed research and

evaluation reports for government Ministries. She also contributed substantially to the Pacific part of

an international publication Waldegrave, C., King, P., Maniapoto, M., Tamasese, T., Parsons, T., and

Sullivan, G. (2016) “Relational Resilience in Māori, Pacific, and European Sole Parent Families: From

Theory and Research to Social Policy”, Family Process, Vol. 55, No. 4. 673–688.

Title:

Co-creating cultural understanding of loneliness and wellbeing, and therapeutic responses to them

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Cheryl White works at Dulwich Centre as publisher, editor, teacher, training co-ordinator, conference host, and initiator of projects. 

Title:

What Would You Have Done? Stories of Complexity from the Field of Narrative Therapy and Community Work 

dd.jpg

David Denborough works as a community worker, teacher and writer/editor for Dulwich Centre. He is particularly interested in cross-cultural partnerships which limit the chances of psychological colonization and create possibilities for cross-cultural inventions

Title:

What Would You Have Done? Stories of Complexity from the Field of Narrative Therapy and Community Work